Immigration History


Boundless Immigration is dedicated to helping immigrants navigate the spouse visa and U.S. citizenship application processes.

Enjoy the following educational posts about the history of immigration to the United States — from the colonial era to the present.


Immigration During the American Revolution

August 4, 2017

The first U.S. Census in 1790 reported a total population of around 3.9 million in the new nation. Nearly the entire enumerated population was composed of either immigrants or their descendants (most Native Americans were not counted). Combining from different… View Article


Top U.S. Suburbs for Immigrants

August 3, 2017

In 2015, Business Insider compiled their list of The 50 Best Suburbs in America, calculated from publicly available data including unemployment, crime, average commute time, median income, level of higher education, and housing affordability. But which of those top 50… View Article


Top U.S. Cities for Immigrants

August 3, 2017

Among U.S. cities with more than 200,000 residents, New York City has the greatest population of immigrants, with nearly 3 million foreign-born residents, accounting for 35.7 percent of a total population of 8.4 million, according to U.S. Census figures published… View Article


George Washington and Immigration

July 21, 2017

During the early years of the United States, the primary concern around immigration largely dealt with how the fledgling country could draw more immigrants. Thomas Jefferson wrote that “the present desire of America is to produce rapid population by as… View Article


Immigration During the Roaring Twenties

July 9, 2017

The Roaring 20s may conjure up cosmopolitain images of flappers, speakeasies, art deco and jazz, but the 1920s were also a period of significant changes to U.S. immigration policy that would have repercussions for decades.The Immigration Act of 1924 (also… View Article


Immigration During the Cold War

July 7, 2017

Cuban refugees near Key West during the 1980 Mariel BoatliftBetween 1947 and 1991, U.S. immigration policy was shaped by the larger Cold War. In many case special allowances were made for migrants coming from Communist countries. In 1956, President Dwight… View Article


Immigration in the 1960s

July 3, 2017

During the 1960s, the foreign-born percentage of the U.S. population hit its lowest levels, hovering around just five percent, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Still, the decade would lay the seeds of a lasting change in the nature of… View Article


Women as a Minority in Immigration

July 3, 2017

Women make up just over half of the world’s population, but according to the Pew Research Center, they account for a slight minority of migrants worldwide. The situation is much more equal than it used to be: in 1984 women… View Article


Jimmy Carter and Immigration

June 7, 2017

Jimmy Carter’s presidency provided something of a bridge between the end of the Vietnam War era and the early Reagan years. A little more than a year into his presidency, in August of 1977, Carter asked Congress to make it illegal… View Article


The Truman Presidency and Immigration

June 4, 2017

Harry S. Truman became the 33rd President of the United States following the death of President Franklin D. Roosevelt on April 12, 1945. He led the country through the final months of World War II and the policies he enacted—many… View Article


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