Boundless Learning Technology
Enriching high quality content with learning technology to make studying more effective.

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Research shows Boundless beats traditional eTextbooks

Research shows Boundless Textbooks are better than traditional eTextbooks
Study Compares How Students Use Boundless and eTextbooks

Chart about how students perform and how long they study

A recent study by two cognitive neuroscience PhDs finds that students using Boundless spend less time studying and achieve higher test scores on follow-up memory tests. Students surveyed reported that information is easier to read and locate with Boundless versus traditional eTextbooks.

A better reading experience.
Students rate their experience on a scale of 1 to 7

The researchers wrote, “The study aids offered by Boundless provide a direct way for students to actively engage with the information they need to learn, consolidating the information for later recollection.” Boundless students performed better and had a more enjoyable user experience. No wonder millions of students study with Boundless!


Boundless Learning Technology is based around two central concepts:

Active Recall
&
Spaced Repetition

Boundless Learning uses proven technologies to ensure you pass your exams and remember critical information for the long term. This learning technology is integrated into Boundless textbooks and study materials, including flashcards and quizzes. These products are based on the latest in educational research and are tested to be the most efficient learning processes possible. Boundless users routinely outperform their classmates. In fact, 94% of Boundless users get the grade they expect or higher.

94% of Boundless users got the grade they expected or higher.

Active Recall

Use it or lose it.
Active recall allows you to make the most of your study time.

Active recall is the process by which knowledge is actively retrieved from memory by taking a quiz, rather than passively reviewed by reading or reviewing notes. Boundless active recall techniques efficiently consolidate long-term memory, and research shows students who study using this technique typically perform 50% better than those who don't.


Learning Through Testing

Researchers asked college students to study a short science text using one of four study methods, then tested them on the material a week later. The most effective study method combined two study sessions with retrieval practice, tests that asked the students to actively recall what they had read.


Taking tests improves long-term retention.

Quizzes

Most students try to memorize facts by repeatedly reviewing content content, like readings or notes. While simply collecting lecture notes and reading them over and over is a simple study method, it’s the least effective. The mind wanders, BuzzFeed creeps in, and the important information is retained at an abysmally low rate.

In four studies, repeated testing produced superior retention of information and students performed better on final tests than their peers who just read over notes. This finding indicates that the benefits of test-enhanced learning are not limited to the retention of the specific response tested during initial learning but rather extend to the transfer of knowledge in a variety of contexts. [1,2,3,4,5]

Spaced Repetition

There is an optimal time to learn, and Boundless knows it.

Spaced repetition is based on the finding that there is an ideal moment to practice what you’ve learned so you can best remember the information in the long term. This is done by optimizing the times at which you review different concepts. Boundless Learning has integrated advanced spaced repetition algorithms to test your knowledge of individual concepts and calculate the optimal review schedule for the material being learnt. Boundless determines a unique pattern of review and repetition for each concept you study.


Reinforcement of Memory Using Spaced Repetition Techniques Over Time
Boundless tests your knowledge of individual concepts in the textbook and collects data about your memory, how you answer questions, where your understanding is weak, and where you need to put more attention. By understanding your knowledge of each topic, Boundless schedules the optimal timing for review of that concept. [6,7,8]

Flashcards

Flashcards that use spaced repetition algorithms are the fastest, and typically most reliable, method of improving memory stability and probability of recall. Throughout a semester, you collect a lot of information — and flashcards with spaced repetition can aid in how well you accumulate that information. Spaced repetition can foster a steady review of concepts and ideas.

Boundless flashcards go beyond just that. Boundless can accurately predict when you need to review a concept again by seeing how you’ve performed studying that concept in the past. Our flashcards help you study at all the right times, so you’re retaining all the information you need.

References

[1] Roediger & Karpicke (2006a). Test-Enhanced Learning: Taking Memory Tests Improves Long-Term Retention

Students were tested (with no feedback) on reading comprehension of a passage over 5 minutes, 2 days, and 1 week. Studying beat testing over 5 minutes, but nowhere else; students believed studying superior to testing over all intervals. At 1 week, testing scores were ~60% versus ~40%.

[2] Allen, G.A., Mahler, W.A., & Estes, W.K. (1969).

One test results in memories as strong a day later as studying 5 times; intervals improve retention compared to massed presentation.

[3] Allen, G.A., Mahler, W.A., & Estes, W.K. (1969). Effects of recall tests on long-term retention of paired associates. Journal of Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior, 8, 463-470

One test results in memories as strong a day later as studying 5 times; intervals improve retention compared to massed presentation.

[4] Karpicke & Roediger (2003). The Critical Importance of Retrieval for Learning

In learning Swahili vocabulary, students were given varying routines of testing or studying or testing and studying; this resulted in similar scores during the learning phase. Students were asked to predict what percentage they’d remember (average: 50% over all groups). One week later, the students who tested remembered ~80% of the vocabulary versus ~35% for non-testing students. Some students were tested or studied more than others; diminishing returns set in very quickly once the memory had formed the first day. Students reported rarely testing themselves and not testing already learned items.

[5] Roediger & Karpicke (2006a). Test-Enhanced Learning: Taking Memory Tests Improves Long-Term Retention

Students were tested (with no feedback) on reading comprehension of a passage over 5 minutes, 2 days, and 1 week. Studying beat testing over 5 minutes, but nowhere else; students believed studying superior to testing over all intervals. At 1 week, testing scores were ~60% versus ~40%.

[6] Peterson, L. R., Wampler, R., Kirkpatrick, M., & Saltzman, D. (1963). Effect of spacing presentations on retention of a paired associate over short intervals. Journal of Experimental Psychology, 66(2), 206-209

[7] Glenberg, A. M. (1977). Influences of retrieval processes on the spacing effect in free recall. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Learning and Memory, 3(3), 282-294

[8] Balota, D. A., Duchek, J. M., & Paullin, R. (1989). Age-related differences in the impact of spacing, lag and retention interval. Psychology and Aging, 4, 3-9