Documents Required for U.S. Citizenship


What supporting documents are needed for the citizenship application and interview?


As part of the naturalization process, all U.S. citizenship applicants are required to provide supporting documents to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Which documents are necessary depends on each applicant’s situation. Green card holders applying for naturalization based on their marriage to a U.S. citizen, for instance, must provide additional documentation, such as a marriage certificate and their spouse’s U.S. passport.

Applicants submit the supporting documents at different stages of the naturalization process. In the tables below, you’ll see which documents are required to be submitted with your Application for Naturalization (Form N-400) and which documents you must bring to your naturalization interview. Make sure to also check out our guide to creating digital documents the way the U.S. government prefers.

For the flat rate of $395, Boundless helps you complete your entire naturalization application, including all supporting documents, independent attorney review, and support from the moment your application is filed until you obtain U.S. citizenship. If you’re not sure whether you qualify for citizenship, you can check your eligibility through Boundless without providing any personal information. Learn more about our services, or get started today.


Form N-400 Required Documents


The documents listed below must be submitted with Form N-400.

Document Type Examples of Acceptable Documents Who Needs to Submit It?
Proof of green card holder (permanent resident) status
  • Copy (front and back) of your green card (officially called the “Permanent Resident Card,” or Form I-551)
All applicants
Application fee payment (see the “Fee Reduction or Waiver” section of our guide to citizenship costs for the appropriate amount, if any)

Send one of the following:

  • Personal check (with your A-Number printed on the back)
  • Money order (with your A-Number printed on the back)
  • Credit card authorization form (Form G-1145, officially called the “e-Notification of Application/Petition Acceptance””)”
All applicants (except those who are exempt or applying for a fee waiver)
Proof of current marital status

Send copies of all of the following, if applicable:

All currently or previously married applicants
Proof of identity
  • Two passport-style photos (2 inches by 2 inches)
Applicants living and applying from abroad
Proof of military service
  • Form N-426 (officially called the “Request for Certification of Military or Naval Service”)
Applicants filing based on their qualifying military service
Proof of medical disability
  • Form N-648 (officially called the “Medical Certification for Disability Exceptions”)
Applicants requesting an exemption from the citizenship test based on a qualifying medical condition
Fee reduction application
  • Form I-942 (officially called the “Request for Reduced Fee”)
Applicants requesting a reduction of the citizenship application fee
Fee waiver application
  • Form I-912 (officially called the “Request for Fee Waiver”)
Applicants requesting a waiver of the citizenship application and biometrics fees
Request for representation at the the naturalization interview
  • Form G-28 (officially called the “Notice of Entry of Appearance as Attorney or Accredited Representative”)
Applicants who wish to be accompanied by an attorney or other representative at their U.S. citizenship interview

Not sure if you qualify for naturalization? You can check your eligibility on Boundless without providing any personal information. When you’re ready to apply, Boundless can guide you through every milestone of the naturalization process, from your N-400 application all the way to the finish line.  Learn more, or start your application now.


Naturalization Interview Required Documents


You must bring the documents listed below with your interview appointment letter to your naturalization interview.

NOTE TO BOUNDLESS CUSTOMERS ONLY: To help ensure that your application is accurate and complete, Boundless may request certain documents below at a different point in the application process.

Document Type Examples of Acceptable Documents Who Needs to Submit It?
Proof of green card holder (permanent resident) status
  • Green card (officially called the “Permanent Resident Card,” or Form I-551)
All applicants
State-issued identification
  • State ID
  • Driver’s license
All applicants
Travel records Bring all of the following:
  • Passports (current and expired)
  • USCIS-issued travel documents (such as Form I-94, officially called the “Arrival/Departure Record”)
All applicants
Proof of current marital status and termination of your prior marriages, if any

Bring original copies of all of the following for yourself:

All currently or previously married applicants
Proof of termination of your spouse’s previous marriages, if any

Bring original copies of all of the following for your spouse:

All currently married applicants (if applicable)
Proof of official name change(s), if any

Bring as many of the following that apply:

All applicants (if applicable)

IMPORTANT: You are allowed to provide copies of the documents listed below this row with your Form N-400, but it’s generally a good idea to wait and bring them to your interview. That’s because any changes that occur between filing your N-400 and taking the Oath of Allegiance mean that you’d need to submit new documentation reflecting the change and USCIS would need to re-evaluate your application, likely causing delays.

Proof of spouse’s U.S. citizenship for the past 3 years prior to filing your Form N-400 Applicants filing based on their marriage to a U.S. citizen
Proof of termination of your previous marriage(s)

Bring original copies of all of the following:

Applicants filing based on their marriage to a U.S. citizen
Proof of an authentic marriage for the past 3 years prior to filing your Form N-400

Bring as many as possible of the following:

  • Joint bank and credit card statements
  • Joint leases or mortgages
  • Birth certificate(s) of your child(ren)
  • Joint insurance policies
  • Joint income tax returns or tax transcripts for the past 3 filing years
Applicants filing based on their marriage to a U.S. citizen
Proof of parental rights over your child(ren)

Bring one of the following for each child:

  • Birth certificate
  • Court order naming you as the parent
  • Adoption papers
Applicants listing their children or dependents on Form N-400
Proof that you have fulfilled your financial support obligations (if applicable)

Bring the following for each dependent child who does not live with you and for other dependents (spouse and/or ex-spouse(s)):

  • Copies of court or government orders for you to provide financial support
  • Canceled checks or money order receipts
  • Copies of court or government documents showing child support and/or alimony payments
  • Records of wage garnishments
  • Notarized letter from the parent or guardian who cares for your child(ren)
Applicants listing their children or dependents on Form N-400
Proof of Internal Revenue Service (IRS) tax payments or overdue tax obligations

Bring copies (or transcripts) of the following:

  • Federal income tax returns for the past 5 filing years (or past 3 filing years if applying based on marriage to a U.S. citizen)

If you owe federal, state, or local taxes:

  • A signed agreement from the appropriate tax office showing that you’ve filed an income tax return and made a payment arrangement for your outstanding balance
  • Documentation from the appropriate tax office showing the current status of your payment arrangement
All applicants, but especially those who apply based on their marriage to a U.S. citizen or who have taken trips abroad of at least 6 months (see more on “Continuous and Physical Presence“)
Proof that you have maintained permanent residence in the United States (see the “Continuous and Physical Presence” section of our guide to U.S. citizenship requirements)

Bring as many as possible of the following:

  • Copy of your passport showing departure and arrival stamps
  • Copies of income tax returns (or transcripts) for the past 5 filing years (or past 3 filing years if applying based on marriage to a U.S. citizen)
  • Rent or mortgage payment receipts
  • Bank, credit card, and loan statements showing regular transactions
  • Auto registration and insurance
  • Other records showing that you maintained your permanent residence
All applicants who have taken any trips abroad lasting over 6 months (181 days) but less than 1 year (364 days)
Proof of Selective Service registration (see more on “Military and Civil Service Registration“)

If you registered for Selective Service, bring the following:

  • Registration Acknowledgement Card (from Selective Service System)

If did not register for Selective Service but were required to, bring all of the following:

  • Status Information Letter (from Selective Service System)
  • A notarized personal affidavit (sworn statement) from yourself, explaining why you did not register
  • Notarized personal affidavits (sworn statements) from other people who knew you and can support your claim
Male applicants of a certain age (see more on “Military and Civil Service Registration“)

Records of previous encounters with law enforcement (see the “Good Moral Character” section of our guide to U.S. citizenship requirements)

IMPORTANT: Documentation is required even if you have been told by anyone (including an attorney, judge, or police officer) that your record no longer exists or that you do not need to provide it to the government.

To help you locate the documents listed below, please refer to our guide on obtaining court, police, or prison records.

If you’ve ever been arrested or detained anywhere in the world, and no charges were filed, bring both of the following:

  • Original or court-certified arrest report
  • Official, certified statement from the law enforcement agency that arrested you or from the court confirming that no charges were filed

If you’ve ever been arrested or detained anywhere in the world, and charges were filed, bring certified copies of all of the following:

  • Arrest reports
  • Charging documents
  • Court dispositions Sentencing reports (including a report that you completed your probationary sentence)
  • Other relevant documents (including those in your favor that you’d like USCIS to consider)

If you’ve ever been convicted or placed in alternative sentencing (such as diversion) or rehabilitation (such as drug treatment or community service), bring both of the following:

  • Original or court-certified sentencing record for each incident
  • Original or agency-certified record showing that you completed your program or sentence (such as a probation or parole record)

If you’ve ever had any arrest or conviction vacated, set aside, sealed, expunged, or removed from your record, bring one of the following:

  • Original or court-certified court order showing any of the above outcomes
  • Original statement from the court that no record exists of your arrest or conviction

If you’ve ever been in a traffic incident that involved alcohol or drugs, led to an arrest, or seriously injured another person, bring the following:

  • Any of the relevant documents listed above, based on the outcome of each incident
  • Original arrest record, if any
  • Original police report

All applicants who have ever been:

  • Arrested
  • Detained
  • Charged
  • Convicted
  • Received an alternative sentence
  • Placed in rehabilitation

Do you have confidential questions about how a criminal background might affect your application for U.S. citizenship? With Boundless, you get an independent immigration attorney who can answer your questions and review your entire application — for no additional fee. Learn more, or get started today.



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